As we recover within Zimbabwe from the startling experience of the army on the streets without the President’s permission, the so-called “non-coup” coup, and face the prospect of a prolonged stalemate between state and military, SADC will once again debate what to do.

The question that arises is whether it will cross the minds of any of the worthy leaders that will assemble for this high level summit, whenever it is convened, that they are as much a part of the problem as they might be of the solution. A brief history of SADC’s engagement with Zimbabwe since 2000 illustrates this.

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